Chuck Barberini Real Estate – Staycation

Chuck Barberini | BR Real Estate Group | EXP Realty
REALTOR®

Planning an exciting trip? Maybe a relaxing staycation is more your style. Either way, find out how you could get $500 to put toward your plans.

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Chuck Barberini | BR Real Estate Group | EXP Realty
REALTOR®
chuck@chuckbarberini.com
1415 Oakland Blvd.
Suite 101
Walnut Creek, CA 94596
Phone: (925) 963-6606
CalBRE 01324660

 

 

 

 

The Ultimate Moving Check List – Chuck Barberini Real Estate

The Ultimate Moving Check List

4 Things to Put on Your Moving Checklist

Moving can be hectic. With dozens of to-dos, a tight timeline and a growing pile of boxes, it’s easy to get frazzled and let things fall through the cracks. But it doesn’t have to be that way.

Get organized now by making a checklist to work from. Set deadlines for the most critical tasks like hiring movers, renting a storage unit and turning on your new utilities. Aside from packing up room by room, make sure your list has these often forgotten items, too:

Forward Your Mail: The post office makes it very easy to ensure your mail gets routed to the right place, at least for the first year after your move. Just head to a local branch or go online to update your address with the date you’ll be moving, and your mail will automatically forward.

Measure and Decide: Take a measuring tape to your new home and jot down the measurements of each wall and nook. What furniture and decor will fit in your new space? What won’t? It’s better to make decisions about what to donate or sell before moving day.

Refill Prescriptions: It may take a bit to get your prescriptions forwarded to a new pharmacy and even longer for you to find the time to pick them up. If possible, get your prescriptions refilled ahead of time from your current pharmacy.

Back Up Your Electronics: Back up your computer and phone to the cloud, and make sure you’ve uploaded all your photos and documents somewhere safe. In the event something happens to your devices during the move, a backup will get you up and running faster.

Are you ready to make a move? Whether you’re considering selling your current home or thinking of finding a new one, get in touch today for help and resources to guide you through the process.

@ChuckBarberini

@EXP Realty

@Charlie_Barberini

@RealEstate4Life

Well In My Day – Chuck Barberini Real Estate

Chuck Barberini Real Estate – BR Real Estate Group

I follow a blog by Doug Giles called Clash Daily it is mostly political and most of it is conservative politics.

Doug has written several books, none of which I have read, the latest might be on my list to knock out soon “Pussification: The Effeminization of the American Male”. Just from reading some of Doug’s blogs and listening some of his pod casts, it occurs to me that Doug is a master of stating the obvious, making connections that we have been conditioned to overlook or ignore, or more importantly accept as the norm. Like cooking a frog, societal changes take place gradually over time, the heat slowly gets turned up, the frog gets comfortable, then sleepy then cooked. One of Doug’s most recent blogs is called 20+ ‘Dangerous Things’ Kids Used to Do – Before P*SSIFICATON Took Over. It is a fun article and insightful and something that we have all talked about, without sounding like an old fart “well in my day” … Check out this blog and let me know what you think and see if you can come up with a few of your own.

20+ ‘Dangerous Things’ Kids Used To Do – Before P*SSIFICATON Took Over

Safe spaces?
Aw, HELL no! Back in the day, that’s the LAST thing any of us wanted!

If you’re old enough to remember when being a kid meant riding your bike in the summer, with your curfew being ‘when it gets dark’, you will remember some of these awesome ‘dangerous pleasures’. (h/t ArtOfManliness)

How many of these are from YOUR list?

Play with fireworks:

Does anything quite compare with the anticipation of lighting, followed by the thrill of watching when it goes off?

(Also, you learn pretty quickly which mistakes you really, REALLY don’t want to make with combustible materials.)

Hammer a Nail

Do you know that not everything that gets put together comes out of a ‘flatpack’ from Ikea?

Knowing how to hit a nail, properly, without tapping it 200 times, bending it in half or flattening your thumb is an important life skill. Let kids learn how while they’re young, so they don’t have to embarrass themselves with ‘Hashtag Adulting’ the first time they need to hang a picture on the wall,

Stick Your Arm Out a Car Window

Because it’s fun. Fun that gives you a ‘hands-on’ physics lesson in aerodynamics, resistance, lift, drag. As long as you’re not trying to learn Braille at 55MPH, relax… your arm will be fine.

Jump Off a Cliff

(Preferably into water.)
If kids learn to manage risks early on, they won’t be paralyzed by the fear of them later.

Use a Bow and Arrow

(Or better still, build your own.) Marksmanship isn’t just about shooting. It’s about a steady hand, judging distance, and understanding variables like wind, and gravity well enough to compensate for them.


Cook a Meal

Because you’ll want options besides Ramen Noodle and take-out when you’re out on your own. The sooner they learn, the better they’ll get.

Climb a Tree

If we need to explain why this is awesome, you’ve been indoors too long. Just go and try it. You’ll thank us later.

Roughhouse

Lions do it. Wolves do it. We should too. It’s Science!

DeBenedet and Cohen boldly claim that roughhousing “makes kids smart, emotionally intelligent, lovable and likable, ethical, physically fit, and joyful.” In short, roughhousing makes your kid awesome.
Source: ArtOfManliness

Sledding
If you have snow where you are, don’t let it go to waste. And high-speed wipeouts just make it all the more awesome!

Drive a Car

I was 5 the first time dad put me on his lap and steer a moving vehicle. And most of my farm kid friends were driving the farm vehicles before they turned 10.

If you’ve got somewhere safe to let them learn, like my dad did and see what’s involved, go for it!

Then again, how about if you want a safe way to let them drive independently, even before they’re street legal?

There’s always the go-kart tracks, where some of those go-karts can hit speeds that can still make the grown-ups sweat.

Burn Things With a Magnifying Glass

A useful skill, and a lot of fun.
(Just make sure they’re not starting fires on school property. School officials get real twitchy about ‘insurance’ issues and such.)

Walk or Ride a Bike to School

Exercise is important for success in school. (Look what happened with the school that tripled their recess!)

What did the other ‘dangerous things’ on the list look like?

Shoot a Gun
Stand on the Roof (one of my personal favorites), Squash a Penny on a Railroad TrackSword Fight With SticksShoot a SlingshotExplore a Construction Site(another favorite, and demolished/burned down buildings were fun, too), Use a Pocket Knife (now in some places there’s a minimum age to even buy one!), and Ride Your Bike Off a Ramp.

(The number of times we all ‘should have died’ doing dumb stuff on our bike is past counting. But, somehow, we lived through it all!),

Don’t forget Climb a Rope (how many people can still do that?), explore a tunnel, or Make a Fire (that magnifying glass is only one way. It’s also important to know the basics of how to go from a single flame to a sustainable fire.)

The list keeps going and going chock-full of memories of what made childhood awesome!

Did our list miss any? Name them in the comments.

Better still, drop a picture in the comments to let the poor kids suffering under today’s ‘structured play’ programs what they’re missing out on.

Maybe they’ll get restless and demand change!

Effeminization Of The
American Male

by Doug Giles

Doug Giles, best-selling author of Raising Righteous And Rowdy Girls and Editor-In-Chief of the mega-blog,
ClashDaily.com, has just penned a book he guarantees will kick hipster males into the rarefied air of
masculinity. That is, if the man-child will put down his frappuccino; shut the hell up and listen and obey
everything he instructs them to do in his timely and tornadic tome. Buy Now:The Effeminization Of The American Male
Wear this to the gym and I guarantee you’ll get some comments.

 

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Chuck Barberini Real Estate – BR Real Estate Group

I follow a blog by Doug Giles called Clash Daily it is mostly political and most of it is conservative politics.

The Gratitude Fad – Chuck Barberini Real Estate

The Gratitude Fad – Chuck Barberini Real Estate – BR Real Estate Group

I have been following Jay Voorhees of JVM Lending’s blog for years, he always has something impactful to say. He deals with market conditions, interest rates trends and some of his best stuff is on life and human nature. Today’s blog, in honor of Thanksgiving week, he discusses gratitude and the “Gratitude Fad”. As a person that has relied on gratitude to pull myself out of dark times and has recently incorporated using the Best Self Journal into my daily routine, which emphasizes writing what you are grateful for at the beginning and end of each day, I really enjoyed what Jay had to say… Check out his blog below and then take a minute to reflect on how blessed we all are.

The new Prager University video “The Key to Unhappiness” also talks about being grateful for what we have and not focusing on what we don’t have.

I have been following Jay Voorhees of JVM Lending’s blog for years, he always has something impactful to say. He deals with market conditions, interest rates trends and some of his best stuff is on life and human nature. Today’s blog, in honor of Thanksgiving week, he discusses gratitude and “The Gratitude Fad”. As a person that has relied on gratitude to pull myself out of dark times and has recently incorporated using the Best Self Journal into my daily routine, which emphasizes writing what you are grateful for at the beginning and end of each day, I really enjoyed what Jay had to say… Check out his blog below and then take a minute to reflect on how blessed we all are.

The new Prager University video “The Key to Unhappiness” also talks about being grateful for what we have and not focusing on what we don’t have.

Thanksgiving and the “Gratitude Fad” – More Than Meets the Eye

Every Thanksgiving we are reminded ad infinitum to give thanks, to be grateful, to show gratitude…until it gets annoying. Equally annoying is the entire “gratitude fad” – the constant reminders all year long to show, think and express gratitude.

But, here’s the thing.

It works.

It not only makes the recipients of your gratitude feel great, studies show that it strengthens your immune system, helps you sleep better, reduces stress and depression, and opens the door to more relationships.  

So, I am piling onto the gratitude fad with this blog. 🙂 It is Thanksgiving week after all.

There was a wonderful article in the WSJ recently about a Jewish woman who was kept in hiding by total strangers during WWII in Greece. The strangers risked their lives and most definitely saved the woman’s life.

She has spent her recent years writing a book about her experiences, and just the act of writing sparked such strong feelings of gratitude that her well-being improved markedly.

The article quotes psychologists who remind us that we can’t just sit around and feel thankful to get the full benefits of gratitude. They suggest the following:

  1. Keep a gratitude journal with detailed entries.
  2. Write sincere thank you notes and emails.
  3. Verbally express and show gratitude – smile and say thank you more often, open doors for people, and just say “hi.”
  4. Avoid ingrates. If the people around you don’t feel gratitude, you probably won’t either. Gratitude is contagious, and so is the lack of it.
  5. Remember the bad.  Remembering difficult times helps you appreciate the good times.

As somebody who practices all of the above, I can say from experience that it really does work.

Thank you everyone for supporting JVM and for reading my blogs (about thanking everyone). 🙂

Jay Voorhees at (925) 855-4491
Real Estate Broker, CA Bureau of Real Estate, BRE# 01524255, NMLS# 335646 

Rates Hold

30 Year Fixed Rate Loan at a Cost of One Point: 3.875%* (APR = 4.105%)
Rates remain unchanged as we head into Thanksgiving week. Quick reminder that the market will be closed Thursday, with an early close Friday as well.

*The above rate quote has the following assumptions: $500,000 purchase; $400,000 loan amount; 20% down payment; credit score above 740; property is SFR; borrower has sufficient income to qualify; Estimated closing costs affecting the APR include $4,000 for Origination Fee; $995 for Lender Fees; $2,300 for Title Insurance (CLTA and ALTA), $800 for Escrow Fee; and $1,000 for Prepaid Interest.

JVM Lending
1850 Mt Diablo Blvd #140
Walnut Creek, CA 94596
United States

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 The Gratitude Fad – Chuck Barberini Real Estate – BR Real Estate Group

FHA vs Conventional loans – Chuck Barberini Real Estate

Chuck Barberini Real Estate – BR Real Estate Group

FHA vs Conventional loans – Thursday November 9th

I get asked this question a lot and for the most part I either defer to the lend or say that FHA offers 96.5% loan. There are different qualifications for the property in FHA appraisals that are much stricter. The subject property is not only appraised for value, it is also inspected for safety, soundness of construction and adherence to local code restrictions. I came across this article yesterday written by Hal Bundrick a staff writer at NerdWallet, it does a great job of explaining the benefits and disadvantages of FHA loans. Take a moment and read this article and share with anyone that is considering purchasing a home in the near future. If you have any questions, I work with quality lenders that can further explain what loan better fits your situation.

Tech Sec

I saw this article On Linkedin this morning, a couple of big names teaming up:

New Salesforce and Google Partnership Shakes Up the Cloud Race

FHA loan vs. conventional mortgage: Which is right for you?

Nerd Wallet

11:59 PM, Nov 7, 2017

When exploring mortgage options, it’s likely you’ll hear about Federal Housing Administration and conventional loans. Let’s see, FHA loans are for first-time home buyers and conventional mortgages are for more established buyers — is that it?

Not necessarily.

Actually, the differences between FHA loans and conventional mortgages have narrowed in the past few years. Since 1934, loans guaranteed by the FHA have been a go-to option for first-time home buyers because they feature low down payments and relaxed credit requirements.

But conventional loans — which are not insured by a government agency like the FHA, the Department of Veterans Affairs or the U.S. Department of Agriculture — have gotten more competitive lately.

Both types of loans have their advantages. Here are the factors to consider when deciding between an FHA and a conventional mortgage.

Property standards

What kind of property are you buying? You can use a conventional loan to buy a vacation home or an investment property, as well as a primary residence.

The same can’t be said about FHA loans.

An FHA loan must be for a property that is occupied by at least one owner, as a primary residence, within 60 days of closing. Investment properties and homes that are being flipped (sold within 90 days of a prior sale) aren’t eligible for FHA loans.

FHA appraisals are more stringent, as well. Not only is the property assessed for value, it is thoroughly vetted for safety, soundness of construction and adherence to local code restrictions.

Loan limits

Where you’re planning to buy your home can play a role in what kind of loan is best for you. FHA and conventional loan guidelines allow wide latitude for borrowers in expensive areas, but in some cases you may end up needing a jumbo loan, which is bigger than FHA or conventional limits.

FHA loans are subject to county-level limits based on a percentage of a county’s median home price. In certain high-cost areas, the limit in 2017 can be as high as $636,150 — and in Alaska, Guam, Hawaii and the Virgin Islands, limits can be much higher than that.

For loans guaranteed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the government-sponsored companies that help fund the conventional mortgage industry, single-family home loan limits are $424,100 in most of the country. Again, higher loan ceilings are available in pricier counties.

You can find your county’s loan limits for FHA (shown at the link as “FHA forward”) and conventional mortgages (“Fannie/Freddie”) on the Department of Housing and Urban Development website.

Down payment

This is where conventional loans have really improved. FHA loans used to be the low-down-payment leader, requiring just 3.5% down. But now, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac both offer 97% loan-to-value products; that means a 3% down payment option — even lower than FHA — for qualified buyers.

From time to time, you can find lenders offering down payment options that are even lower on conventional loans. Quicken Loans, for instance, has offered a 1% down loan.

Foreclosures

Another instance where FHA and conventional standards have converged: how bad credit is accounted for. Over the past few years there have been numerous changes to the policies regarding bad-credit issues and how they are treated for FHA and conventional loans, with new standards implemented — and then expiring.

However, as it stands now, for a buyer to qualify for either an FHA or conventional loan, it typically must be two years since a bankruptcy was discharged and three years since a foreclosure or short sale.

There will definitely be hurdles to clear to prove to a lender that you have re-established your creditworthiness:

  • You’ll have to document that circumstances leading to the financial setback were beyond your control
  • You may have to attend a credit education course
  • Your loan will likely have to go through a manual loan approval process, which means approval and closing will likely take longer.

Mortgage insurance

With a down payment of less than 20%, both FHA and conventional loans require borrowers to pay mortgage insurance premiums. This insurance helps defray the lender’s costs if a loan defaults.

There are some differences between the two insurance programs.

With an FHA loan, if you put less than 10% down, you’ll pay 1.75% of the loan amount upfront and make monthly mortgage insurance payments for the life of the loan. With a down payment of 10% or more (that is, a loan-to-value of 90% or better), the premiums will end after 11 years.

Conventional loans with less than 20% down charge private mortgage insurance. It can be charged as an upfront expense payable at closing, or built into your monthly payment — or both. It all depends on the insurer the lender uses.

“The rates for PMI vary according to two factors: credit score and loan-to-value ratio,” Joe Parsons, a senior loan officer with PFS Funding in Dublin, California, says. He provides the following examples:

  • A borrower with a 620 score with a 97% loan-to-value will pay 2.37%
  • The same loan for a borrower with a 760 score will cost 0.69%
  • A borrower with a 620 score and a 90% loan-to-value will pay 1.10%
  • The same loan for a borrower with a 760 score will cost 0.31%

PMI generally can be canceled once your loan is paid down (and/or your property’s value appreciates) to 78% of your home’s value.

Mortgage insurance

FHA Conventional
Upfront premium cost 1.75% Depending on the insurer, there may or may not be an upfront premium. You can also opt to make a single-premium payment instead of monthly payments.
Monthly premium cost Cost varies. Based on loan term, amount and down payment. For purchase loans, the premium ranges from 0.45% to 1.05%, according to the FHA. Cost varies. Based on credit score and loan-to-value. For purchase loans, fees can range from 0.55% to 2.25%, according to Genworth and the Urban Institute.
Duration With down payments less than 10%, you’ll pay mortgage insurance for the life of the loan. With a loan-to-value equal to or greater than 90%, you’ll pay the premiums for 11 years. Usually can be canceled once your loan balance reaches 78% of your home’s value.

 

Credit score standards

Here is the primary distinction between the two types of loans: FHA loans are easier to qualify for. As far as a credit score, FHA sets a low bar: a FICO of 500 or above. Lenders can set “overlays” on top of that credit score requirement, hiking the minimum much higher.

But to qualify for the lowest FHA down payment of 3.5%, you’ll need a credit score of 580 or more, says Brian Sullivan, HUD public affairs specialist. With a credit score between 500 and 579, you’ll need to put down 10% on an FHA loan, he adds.

The average FICO score for FHA purchase loans closed in 2016 was 686, according to mortgage industry software provider Ellie Mae.

Conventional loans typically require a FICO credit score of 620 or better, Parsons says.

“A borrower with that score who can document income and assets will, in all likelihood, receive a loan approval,” he says. “They will pay a higher price for that loan because of ‘risk-based pricing’ from Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, but it is unlikely that they will be declined because of their credit score.”

Risk-based pricing means compensating the lender for taking the additional risk on a borrower with a lower credit score (the average FICO score for a conventional loan was 753 in 2016, according to Ellie Mae). In other words, the lower your credit score, the higher your mortgage interest rate.

Debt-to-income ratios

HUD’s Sullivan says your debt-to-income ratio — including the new mortgage, credit cards, student loans or any other monthly obligations — must be 50% or less for an FHA loan. Ellie Mae reports the average debt ratio for borrowers closing FHA purchase loans in 2016 was 42%.

Conventional loans usually require a debt-to-income ratio no higher than 45%, Parsons says. In 2016, borrowers with conventional purchase loans averaged a 34% debt ratio, according to Ellie Mae.

Mortgage rates

Another distinction for FHA loans: generally lower mortgage interest rates. However, the difference between the two was incremental last year. The 30-year fixed rate for FHA purchase loans closed in 2016 averaged 3.95%, compared with a conventional mortgage rate on the same term of 4.06%, according to Ellie Mae.

Refinancing

As far as mortgage refinancing goes, the edge goes to FHA “streamline” refinancing. With no credit check, no income verification and likely no home appraisal, it’s about as easy a refi as you can get. But there are five requirements for an FHA streamline refinance.

So, which mortgage to choose?

Your decision may initially be based on your credit score. If it’s well below 620, an FHA loan may be your only choice. Above 620 and you’ll want to run the numbers on both to see what works best for you.

However, if you are serving in the military or are a veteran, a loan backed by the VA may be the way to go. VA loans usually require no down payment. And if you live in a suburban or rural area, a USDA loan could be a smart option, too.

FHA Loans vs. Conventional Loans

  FHA Conventional
Property type Financing for a primary residence only Financing for a primary residence, second home or investment property
Down payment  Down payments as low as 3.5% Some programs offer down payments as low as 3% or even lower
Mortgage insurance Mortgage insurance premiums required: 1.75% upfront and monthly premiums that vary with your loan term, loan amount and down payment, from 0.45% to 1.05% With a down payment lower than 20%, private mortgage insurance is usually required. Monthly fees vary according to credit score, loan-to-value and insurer, and range from 0.55% to 2.25%.
Credit score Credit score of 500 or better is usually required, though this depends on the lender. Average FICO score in 2016: 686. Credit score of 620 or higher is usually required, though this depends on the lender. Average FICO score in 2016: 753, according to Ellie Mae.
Debt ratio Average 2016 debt ratio: 42% Average 2016 debt ratio: 34%
Interest rates Interest rates for FHA loans tend to be slightly lower than for conventional loans Interest rates for conventional loans tend to be slightly higher than for FHA loans

Hal Bundrick is a staff writer at NerdWallet, a personal finance website. Email: hal@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @halmbundrick.

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FHA loan vs. conventional mortgage: Which is right for you?

 FHA vs Conventional loans

Chuck Barberini Real Estate – BR Real Estate Group

 

Are Homes More Affordable – Chuck Barberini Real Estate

Chuck Barberini Real Estate – BR Real Estate Group

Check out this article from Realtor Magazine Online. It is a real unique look at the housing market and offers a very original point of view. It gives us some good insight into the rapid rise of house prices and how they compare to the prices prior to the pre-crash prices.

Homes Are More Affordable Than 20 Years Ago

DAILY REAL ESTATE NEWS | WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 08, 2017

Homes are actually more affordable now than they were in the late 1990s, according to the latest Mortgage Monitor Report by Black Knight Inc., a mortgage data and performance information provider.

A Closer Look: NAR’s Housing Affordability Index

Interest rates have plunged by 40 basis points over the past six months. However, the bulk of the potential savings is offset by the accelerating rate of home price appreciation across the country.

“Rising home prices continue to offset the majority of would-be savings from recent interest rate declines, which has kept affordability near a post recession low,” says Ben Graboske, executive vice president of data & analytics for Black Knight. “That being said, when viewing the market through a longer-term lens, affordability across most of the country still remains favorable to long-term benchmarks.”

As of September, 21.4 percent of the median income nationwide was required to purchase a median-priced home. From 1995 to 1999, that percentage was 24.2 percent, and from 2000 to 2003 it was 26.2 percent, according to Black Knight’s report.

While the monthly payment needed for a median-priced home is up $100 from a year ago, the national “payment-to-income” ratio remains 2.8 percent below averages from the late 1990s, according to the report.

“In looking at the affordability landscape across the country, we certainly see varying levels of affordability in each market compared to their own long-term benchmarks,” Graboske says. “But, by and large, the overall theme is that affordability in most areas, while tightening, remains favorable to long-term norms.”

Black Knight researchers note that 47 of 50 states’ payment-to-income ratios remain below their 1995–2003 averages. Hawaii, California, Oregon, and Washington, D.C., are the lone exceptions, where payment-to-income ratios are higher today than their long-term benchmarks.

Source: Black Knight Inc.

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Home Purchase Sentiment Index Decreases – Chuck Barberini

Chuck Barberini Real Estate – Barberini Robinson Real Estate Group

http://barberinico.com/home-purchase-sentiment-index-decreases/

Home Purchase Sentiment Index Decreases from High of 85.3 to 83.2. Fewer Consumers Expect Home Prices, Mortgage Rates to Keep Climbing; Stagnant Wages Weigh on Housing Outlook

I just pulled this article off of the California Association of Realtors “Newsline”. I find it interesting because when we listen to or read the news, we find out about how strong the housing market is. Interest rates are at a, close to, all-time low, but housing prices are up and inventory is still low. What is interesting is that these numbers are polling numbers based on consumer confidence. It seems that there is a lot of uncertainty in the populace these days.

In my opinion it makes tons of sense, based partially on the contentious presidential race. The recent events point out that, as we learned after the recent financial meltdown, the middle class is just a pawn in the governments chess game. The decisions being made, that impact the middle class so much, do not have our well being in mind. Furthermore, our representatives in the government are being held to different standards then the people that they are sworn to serve and protect. Their interest in pushing forward an agenda that has little or nothing to do with helping Americans survive and thrive has become more and more transparent. Lying to their constituents, changing the rule of law, all the while getting richer and richer.

Uncertainty? Consumer confidence? It makes a lot of sense. Check out this article from July 7th and let me know what you think.

Good Luck,

Chuck

 

Home Purchase Sentiment Index Decreases from High of 85.3 to 83.2. Fewer Consumers Expect Home Prices, Mortgage Rates to Keep Climbing; Stagnant Wages Weigh on Housing Outlook

Jennifer Lucas

202-752-6497

WASHINGTON, DC – Fannie Mae’s Home Purchase Sentiment Index™ (HPSI) decreased 2.1 points to 83.2 in June, down from May’s all-time survey high, as more consumers report mixed views toward housing and income growth. Among those surveyed, the share who said now is a good time to sell a home increased 5 percentage points on net to a survey-high of 18 percent, and those saying now is a good time to buy a home rose 3 percentage points on net to 32 percent. The share of consumers who expect home prices to go up over the next 12 months dropped 9 percentage points on net. In addition, those reporting that their household income is significantly higher than it was 12 months ago dropped 10 percentage points on net in June, and the net share of consumers who are not concerned about losing their job fell 4 percentage points. Fewer consumers also reported a positive outlook on the state of the economy – those who think the economy is on the wrong track ticked up to 59 percent in June.

hpsi-070716

 

 

 

“The HPSI’s pullback in June from last month’s survey-high reading suggests a slight weakening in the 12-month outlook for housing activity,” said Doug Duncan, senior vice president and chief economist at Fannie Mae. “Pending home sales have pulled back in the face of continued home price growth, and we’re seeing some softening in the higher priced components of the market. Growing pessimism about the overall direction of the economy gives us further pause as it now stands at the highest level we’ve seen in our National Housing Survey in the last two years. Meaningful improvement in the housing market going forward will likely require consistent upward movement in consumers’ income growth perceptions, which have thus far been stagnant. Also helpful would be an acceleration of supply accumulation of entry-level homes, which would moderate the growth of real home prices and increase affordability.”

HOME PURCHASE SENTIMENT INDEX – COMPONENT HIGHLIGHTS

Fannie Mae’s June 2016 Home Purchase Sentiment Index (HPSI) fell 2.1 percentage points in June to 83.2. Slightly more consumers on net expect mortgage interest rates to go down over the next 12 months. Overall, the HPSI is down 1.5 points since this time last year.

  • After three straight months of declines, the net share of Americans who say that it is a good time to buy a house rose by 3 percentage points to 32%.
  • Selling sentiment rose in June, with the net percentage of those who say it is a good time to sell rising 5 percentage points to 18% – a new survey high. A survey high and low were reached for those who think it is a good time and bad time to sell a home.
  • The net share of Americans who say that home prices will go up fell 9 percentage points to 33%.
  • The net share of those who say mortgage rates will go down over the next 12 months rose 2 percentage points to negative 41%, reaching an 18-month high.
  • The net share of Americans who say they are not concerned with losing their job fell 4 percentage points to 68%.
  • The net share of Americans who say their household income is significantly higher than it was 12 months ago fell 10 percentage points to 8%, the largest month-to-month decline in the survey’s history.

ABOUT FANNIE MAE’S HOME PURCHASE SENTIMENT INDEX

The Home Purchase Sentiment Index (HPSI) distills information about consumers’ home purchase sentiment from Fannie Mae’s National Housing Survey® (NHS) into a single number. The HPSI reflects consumers’ current views and forward-looking expectations of housing market conditions and complements existing data sources to inform housing-related analysis and decision making. The HPSI is constructed from answers to six NHS questions that solicit consumers’ evaluations of housing market conditions and address topics that are related to their home purchase decisions. The questions ask consumers whether they think that it is a good or bad time to buy or to sell a house, what direction they expect home prices and mortgage interest rates to move, how concerned they are about losing their jobs, and whether their incomes are higher than they were a year earlier.

ABOUT FANNIE MAE’S NATIONAL HOUSING SURVEY

The most detailed consumer attitudinal survey of its kind, Fannie Mae’s National Housing Survey (NHS) polled 1,000 Americans via live telephone interview to assess their attitudes toward owning and renting a home, home and rental price changes, homeownership distress, the economy, household finances, and overall consumer confidence. Homeowners and renters are asked more than 100 questions used to track attitudinal shifts, six of which are used to construct the HPSI (findings are compared with the same survey conducted monthly beginning June 2010). As cell phones have become common and many households no longer have landline phones, the NHS contacts 60 percent of respondents via their cell phones (as of October 2014). To reflect the growing share of households with a cell phone but no landline, the National Housing Survey has increased its cell phone dialing rate to 60 percent as of October 2014. For more information, please see the Technical Notes. Fannie Mae conducts this survey and shares monthly and quarterly results so that we may help industry partners and market participants target our collective efforts to stabilize the housing market in the near-term, and provide support in the future. The June 2016 National Housing Survey was conducted between June 1, 2016 and June 23, 2016. Most of the data collection occurred during the first two weeks of this period. Interviews were conducted by Penn Schoen Berland, in coordination with Fannie Mae.

DETAILED HPSI & NHS FINDINGS

For detailed findings from the June 2016 Home Purchase Sentiment Index and National Housing Survey, as well as a brief HPSI overview and detailed white paper, technical notes on the NHS methodology, and questions asked of respondents associated with each monthly indicator, please visit the Consumer Attitude Measures page on fanniemae.com. Also available on the site are in-depth topic analyses, which provide a detailed assessment of combined data results from three monthly studies of NHS results.

To receive e-mail updates with other housing market research from Fannie Mae’s Economic & Strategic Research Group, please click here.
Fannie Mae enables people to buy, refinance, or rent homes.

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 Home Purchase Sentiment Index Decreases from High of 85.3 to 83.2. Fewer Consumers Expect Home Prices, Mortgage Rates to Keep Climbing; Stagnant Wages Weigh on Housing Outlook.

http://barberinico.com/home-purchase-sentiment-index-decreases/

11 Things Truly Successful People Never Do (Ever) – Chuck Barberini

Chuck Barberini Real Estate – Barberini Robinson Real Estate Group

11 Things Truly Successful People Never Do (Ever) – Chuck Barberini

http://barberinico.com/11-things-truly-successful-people-never-do

I came across this article by Bill Murphy Jr., I have read several of his articles and really enjoy them. I realize that many of the things that he points out may be hard to implement. But, reading stuff like this plants a seed and baby step forward are always positive. Check out this article and let me know what you think. Also, there is a link below that you can use to receive emails from Bill with more of these great articles. There is also a link below that you can click on to see what mortgage rates are doing today. Thanks, Chuck

11 Things Truly Successful People Never Do (Ever)

You can drive yourself crazy trying to find the keys to success. Or you can just eliminate these 11 behaviors, and take some big steps toward achieving your goals.

BY BILL MURPHY JR.

 

Executive editor, TheMid.com, and founder, ProGhostwriters.com@BillMurphyJr

 

How do you define success?

For some people, it’s achieving a level of respect and accomplishment. Others benchmark their personal relationships. Of course, we all know some people who judge it only by the size of their bank accounts.

Regardless, there are certain behaviors and habits that you’ll find the most successful people have in common. Even more important, there are things that highly successful people avoid at almost all costs.A Successful Person

So, two things. First, check out my free e-book: How to Raise Successful Kids(download here). Second, take a look at the elements below–things that highly successful people refuse to do–and think about the challenges at the end of each one.

1. Successful people refuse to fit in a box.

“Thinking outside the box” is a business cliché writ large. But truly successful people do more than that–they live outside the box.

They don’t let other people define them, whether those other people are malicious or well-meaning. They don’t listen to the jealous boss who tells them that they’ll never be a leader. Perhaps more important, they don’t hedge their ambitions because a parent or a teacher told them that–for example–they’re “good with numbers” but not creative, or an excellent team player but not a leader. They don’t just develop their strengths. They define their strengths.

Challenge: What external expectation do you need to let go of?

2. Successful people don’t bear grudges.

It takes a lot of effort to win a battle. But when you bear grudges, it’s like you’re fighting a war that only one side even knows about.

Sure, if we bothered, most of us could probably dig deep into our pasts and find a time when we were wronged–almost unforgivably wronged. Even thinking about it, however, hands another victory to whoever wronged you. Direct your energy at something else–the things you truly care about.

Challenge: We all hold on to some things too long. What transgression do you need to forgive?

3. Successful people refuse to argue over “nothings.”

Again: wasted energy.

You’re not going to convince that diehard Trump/Hillary/Bernie supporter on Facebook to change his or her mind. Truly successful people spend their energy on things they can truly affect.

Challenge: What deeply held conviction holds you back? Are you prepared to let it go?

4. Successful people refuse to quit.

Successful people are often more successful simply because they work harder. And they work harder in part because the work they do doesn’t feel like work–at least, it doesn’t feel like drudgery. Their work is the kind of thing they’d do even if they weren’t paid for it (and sometimes, they aren’t!).

However, whether it’s rewarding or not, they don’t ignore the important work that needs to be done.

Challenge: You don’t have to say it aloud, but when was the last time you blew off something important and covered it with excuses? Are you planning to do it again anytime soon?

5. Successful people never betray their values.

At the end of everything, what else do you have besides your deeply held values?

Maybe you have a deep religious faith. Maybe you think it’s wrong to eat meat. Maybe you’d never root for an American League baseball team because you think the designated hitter ruined the sport. These are your values, not mine, my friend–and I’m sure they’re tested all the time. Truly successful people don’t have a lot of non-negotiables, but the ones they do have are sacrosanct.

Challenge: Can you articulate your core values? Even more important, are they obvious to others?

6. Successful people never betray friends or family.

Of course, this doesn’t mean letting yourself be rolled over. You have to stick up for yourself. However, truly successful people know that if your close family and true friends can’t trust you, why would anyone else?

Challenge: Um, when was the last time you called your folks?

7. Successful people never lose sight of their goals.

Identifying and pursuing your goals means the difference between spinning your wheels and actually getting somewhere. You’ll put in the same effort regardless of how well you focus on objectives, but if your aim is deficient, chances are that you’ll just be helping someone else achieve his or her goals.

Challenge: Can you articulate your three most important goals? What have you done today to make them come true?

8. Successful people combat self-doubt in all its forms.

Fear is normal, even healthy–but defeatism is a disease. I’m not sure where it comes from, but we all face it. Successful people refuse to give in, but what’s more, they make it part of their mission to help other people overcome self-doubt, too.

The easiest way to do that? Demonstrate respect for others in all that you do.

Challenge: Have you built up someone else’s ego today? If not, is it because you’re afraid that doing so will tear down your own self-worth? (Overcome that!)

9. Successful people refuse to betray their health.

Another non-negotiable. None of us lives forever, yet the temptation is always there to trade fitness, or sleep, or well-being for a pauper’s price–a few extra bucks, a little bit of esteem in a boss’s eyes. Truly successful people have no room for that in their lives. Their health is one of their top priorities.

Challenge: What’s the one thing you should do differently to ensure you have a better chance at living a long time–and well?

10. Successful people refuse to be dominated by others.

We all face bullies in our lives. Truly successful people don’t put up with them. They find ways to prevail. They don’t necessarily fight the other guy on his turf, but they find a way to win.

Beware that you don’t contradict the rule about not holding grudges with this one, but successful people find that standing up for themselves often means standing up to someone else.

Challenge: Who are the bullies you know? What have you done to offset their impact on others?

11. Successful people never give in to competition.

This is a multifaceted element. Successful people never run from competition–but they don’t let themselves be suckered into being measured by somebody else’s rules. They understand the wisdom of the reverse of that old lottery slogan: “You can’t lose if you refuse to play.”

At the same time, when they win, they can take a compliment. Truly successful people don’t gloat, but they also don’t minimize their contributions when other people are eager to offer them praise.

Challenge: What competitions are you engaging in that aren’t truly worthwhile?

Like this column? Sign up to subscribe to email alerts and you’ll never miss a post.

The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.

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11 Things Truly Successful People Never Do (Ever) – Chuck Barberini

Mortgage Rates Hover Near All-Time Low – Chuck Barberini

Mortgage Rates Hover Near All-Time Low – Chuck Barberini

Chuck Barberini Real Estate – Barberini Robinson Real Estate Group

http://barberinico.com/mortgage-rates-all-time-low/

Here is a short article on Mortgage Rates from Daily Real Estate News. Rates approach a near all-time low, currently average rates are at 3.48%, 17 basis points above an all-time low of 3.31% from November of 2012. I mention in a previous post that the lower interest rates have led to an increase in underwriting scrutiny. Regardless of how difficult the process currently is, if you currently are in a FHA loan and have been paying Mortgage Insurance for any length of time you should contact your loan agent to see if you can refinance your home. Click the link at the bottom of the page to see the current rates. Check out this short article and let me know what you think. Chuck

Print

Mortgage Rates Hover Near All-Time Low

DAILY REAL ESTATE NEWS | FRIDAY, JULY 01, 2016

Fixed-rate mortgages this week dropped to their lowest averages of the year, which analysts attribute to the fallout from last week’s “Brexit” vote. The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 3.48 percent this week, only 17 basis points from its all-time record low of 3.31 percent in November 2012, Freddie Mac reports.

Read more: ‘Brexit’ Could Give U.S. Real Estate Brief Boost

“In the wake of the Brexit vote, the yield on the 10-year U.S. Treasury bond plummeted 24 basis points,” says Sean Becketti, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. “This extremely low mortgage rate should support solid home sales and refinancing volume this summer.”

Freddie Mac reports the following national averages for the week ending June 30:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages:averaged 3.48 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 3.56 percent average. Last year at this time, 30-year rates averaged 4.08 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgages:averaged 2.78 percent, with an average 0.4 point, dropping from last week’s 2.83 percent average. Last year at this time, 15-year rates averaged 3.24 percent.
  • 5-year hybrid adjustable-rate mortgages:averaged 2.70 percent, with an average 0.5 point, falling from last week’s 2.74 percent average. A year ago, 5-year ARMs averaged 2.99 percent.

rates_063016Source: Freddie Mac

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Mortgage Rates Hover Near All-Time Low – Chuck Barberini

 

Flashing Yellow Lights on Affordability – Chuck Barberini

Flashing Yellow Lights on Affordability – Chuck Barberini

Chuck Barberini Real Estate – Barberini Robinson Real Estate Group

A thought on affordability in the current and upcoming market. Low interest rates and record high rent rates seems to be the perfect storm for first time buyers. Unfortunately, the rapid rise in housing prices makes the transition from renter to owner is becoming more difficult and that trend looks to continue. Check out this article by Lawrence Yun and let me know what you think. Chuck

Yun: ‘Flashing Yellow Lights on Affordability’

DAILY REAL ESTATE NEWS | MONDAY, JUNE 27, 2016

The median price of an existing home reached a new record last month at $239,700. That price increase was primarily driven by repeat buyers trading up or downsizing from their current home, according to data from NAR. First-time buyers, meanwhile, continue to be held back by affordability issues.

Rent to Own
Rent to Own

Read moreHomes Getting Less Affordable for Many

“We are seeing flashing yellow lights on affordability,” says Lawrence Yun, NAR’s chief economist. “People who are currently renting and want to convert into ownership — major difficulty. Home prices are rising way too fast compared to people’s income and wage growth. … We are facing housing affordability challenges already with low mortgage rates, but what happens when the rates begin to rise?”

Affordability issues are the primary reason why housing hasn’t had a stronger recovery. “While housing should be pushing overall economic growth, it is not, due to the meager activity in home construction, says Diana Olick, CNBC’s real estate correspondent. “Rental demand has been fueling most of the construction activity, but multifamily housing starts are starting to slow, as most of the activity was in higher-priced, urban rentals, where supply is now high.”

“The tight supply of homes on the market continues to constrain sales, while low mortgage rates and job growth help fuel healthy demand,” notes Andrew LePage, research analyst at CoreLogic. “This results in a pressure cooker effect, and the market’s traditional pressure release valve — new home construction — isn’t helping much, given that new home sales are running more than 40 percent below historically normal levels.”

Source: “New Warning Lights for Rising Home Prices,” CNBC (June 23, 2016)

Mortgage Rates and Market Data

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Chuck Barberini Real Estate – Barberini Robinson Real Estate Group

 Flashing Yellow Lights on Affordability – Chuck Barberini