Chuck Barberini Real Estate – Tiny Houses

EXP Real Estate – BR Real Estate Group – Chuck Barberini Real Estate – Tiny Houses

Do you have the biggest housing trend of the year?

Could you use a detached living space?

Today’s homeowners and homebuyers love detached living spaces. These small stand-alone structures located on the property come with all sorts of benefits — from added room for storage and recreation to extra income.

They’re also easy and affordable to design and install. Starting at around $9,600, this additional square footage can deliver serious bang for your buck, as detached areas can serve as:

Private Rental Space: You can offer the unit on a vacation rental site or lease it to a full-time tenant to bring in some extra income year-round.

Individual Living Quarters: These separate units are perfect for multigenerational families. They can be used by college kids home for summer or elderly parents who need assistance but want privacy. They’re also ideal guest rooms for family and friends coming to visit.

Quiet Home Office: Private, quiet and separated from all the hustle and bustle of the main house, detached units make highly functional home offices for the self-employed entrepreneur or side hustler.

Creative or Leisure Room: Need somewhere to escape and relax? These units are your solution. Personalize them with an art studio, a cozy reading nook, a yoga space or whatever else helps you wind down.

Fun Kids’ Playroom: Give the kids a space of their own with a toy-filled playroom in the backyard. They’re perfect for late-night slumber parties and playing video games with friends.

If you’re interested in building a detached living space on your property, get in touch today for recommendations for local contractors and designers. Remember to also look into any municipal or HOA restrictions, as you may need permits before starting your build-out.

Want to learn more about the market’s latest real estate trends and how your house compares? Get in touch today.

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Seller didn’t hire an agent? Here’s why you should – Chuck Barberini Real Estate

Chuck Barberini
BR Real Estate Group | EXP Realty
(925) 963-6606

Want a home that’s for sale by owner?
Homes that are for sale by owner — when a seller decides not to hire a listing agent — are more common than you might think. They account for about 8 percent of all home listings currently on the market. If you’re on the house hunt, you’re likely to come across one in your search.
What’s different about buying one of these homes? What can you do to leverage the situation to get the most for your money? Here are four things to keep in mind.


1. Hire an agent. Since the seller doesn’t have an agent, it’s vital that you do  if only to ensure the transaction is handled correctly and legally. An agent will be knowledgeable about market conditions and can help you craft your offer, prepare the contracts and find the right lender to work with.

2. Be ready to negotiate. These homes are rarely priced appropriately. Sellers typically overvalue their homes due to their emotional attachment to it. Having an agent on your side gives you access to comparable sales data to help you negotiate the right price.

3. Get a home inspection. The owner may not know that they are legally required to disclose known issues with the property, and that oversight could mean costly repairs down the road. A home inspection can shed light on potential problems before you go through with the sale.

4. Add contingencies to your contract. Contingencies give you an exit route should something go wrong during the transaction. If you can’t get a loan, you’re unhappy with the inspection results or the appraisal doesn’t come in at the sale price, you have a way to back out and save your money.
Want to be prepared for your new home purchase? Get in touch today for help on making the best decision for your budget and goals.

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– Chuck Barberini

Chuck Barberini | BR Real Estate Group | EXP Realty
REALTOR®
chuck@chuckbarberini.com
1415 Oakland Blvd.
Suite 101
Walnut Creek, CA 94596
Phone: (925) 963-6606
CalBRE 01324660

 

 

 

 

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Well In My Day – Chuck Barberini Real Estate

Chuck Barberini Real Estate – BR Real Estate Group

I follow a blog by Doug Giles called Clash Daily it is mostly political and most of it is conservative politics.

Doug has written several books, none of which I have read, the latest might be on my list to knock out soon “Pussification: The Effeminization of the American Male”. Just from reading some of Doug’s blogs and listening some of his pod casts, it occurs to me that Doug is a master of stating the obvious, making connections that we have been conditioned to overlook or ignore, or more importantly accept as the norm. Like cooking a frog, societal changes take place gradually over time, the heat slowly gets turned up, the frog gets comfortable, then sleepy then cooked. One of Doug’s most recent blogs is called 20+ ‘Dangerous Things’ Kids Used to Do – Before P*SSIFICATON Took Over. It is a fun article and insightful and something that we have all talked about, without sounding like an old fart “well in my day” … Check out this blog and let me know what you think and see if you can come up with a few of your own.

20+ ‘Dangerous Things’ Kids Used To Do – Before P*SSIFICATON Took Over

Safe spaces?
Aw, HELL no! Back in the day, that’s the LAST thing any of us wanted!

If you’re old enough to remember when being a kid meant riding your bike in the summer, with your curfew being ‘when it gets dark’, you will remember some of these awesome ‘dangerous pleasures’. (h/t ArtOfManliness)

How many of these are from YOUR list?

Play with fireworks:

Does anything quite compare with the anticipation of lighting, followed by the thrill of watching when it goes off?

(Also, you learn pretty quickly which mistakes you really, REALLY don’t want to make with combustible materials.)

Hammer a Nail

Do you know that not everything that gets put together comes out of a ‘flatpack’ from Ikea?

Knowing how to hit a nail, properly, without tapping it 200 times, bending it in half or flattening your thumb is an important life skill. Let kids learn how while they’re young, so they don’t have to embarrass themselves with ‘Hashtag Adulting’ the first time they need to hang a picture on the wall,

Stick Your Arm Out a Car Window

Because it’s fun. Fun that gives you a ‘hands-on’ physics lesson in aerodynamics, resistance, lift, drag. As long as you’re not trying to learn Braille at 55MPH, relax… your arm will be fine.

Jump Off a Cliff

(Preferably into water.)
If kids learn to manage risks early on, they won’t be paralyzed by the fear of them later.

Use a Bow and Arrow

(Or better still, build your own.) Marksmanship isn’t just about shooting. It’s about a steady hand, judging distance, and understanding variables like wind, and gravity well enough to compensate for them.


Cook a Meal

Because you’ll want options besides Ramen Noodle and take-out when you’re out on your own. The sooner they learn, the better they’ll get.

Climb a Tree

If we need to explain why this is awesome, you’ve been indoors too long. Just go and try it. You’ll thank us later.

Roughhouse

Lions do it. Wolves do it. We should too. It’s Science!

DeBenedet and Cohen boldly claim that roughhousing “makes kids smart, emotionally intelligent, lovable and likable, ethical, physically fit, and joyful.” In short, roughhousing makes your kid awesome.
Source: ArtOfManliness

Sledding
If you have snow where you are, don’t let it go to waste. And high-speed wipeouts just make it all the more awesome!

Drive a Car

I was 5 the first time dad put me on his lap and steer a moving vehicle. And most of my farm kid friends were driving the farm vehicles before they turned 10.

If you’ve got somewhere safe to let them learn, like my dad did and see what’s involved, go for it!

Then again, how about if you want a safe way to let them drive independently, even before they’re street legal?

There’s always the go-kart tracks, where some of those go-karts can hit speeds that can still make the grown-ups sweat.

Burn Things With a Magnifying Glass

A useful skill, and a lot of fun.
(Just make sure they’re not starting fires on school property. School officials get real twitchy about ‘insurance’ issues and such.)

Walk or Ride a Bike to School

Exercise is important for success in school. (Look what happened with the school that tripled their recess!)

What did the other ‘dangerous things’ on the list look like?

Shoot a Gun
Stand on the Roof (one of my personal favorites), Squash a Penny on a Railroad TrackSword Fight With SticksShoot a SlingshotExplore a Construction Site(another favorite, and demolished/burned down buildings were fun, too), Use a Pocket Knife (now in some places there’s a minimum age to even buy one!), and Ride Your Bike Off a Ramp.

(The number of times we all ‘should have died’ doing dumb stuff on our bike is past counting. But, somehow, we lived through it all!),

Don’t forget Climb a Rope (how many people can still do that?), explore a tunnel, or Make a Fire (that magnifying glass is only one way. It’s also important to know the basics of how to go from a single flame to a sustainable fire.)

The list keeps going and going chock-full of memories of what made childhood awesome!

Did our list miss any? Name them in the comments.

Better still, drop a picture in the comments to let the poor kids suffering under today’s ‘structured play’ programs what they’re missing out on.

Maybe they’ll get restless and demand change!

Effeminization Of The
American Male

by Doug Giles

Doug Giles, best-selling author of Raising Righteous And Rowdy Girls and Editor-In-Chief of the mega-blog,
ClashDaily.com, has just penned a book he guarantees will kick hipster males into the rarefied air of
masculinity. That is, if the man-child will put down his frappuccino; shut the hell up and listen and obey
everything he instructs them to do in his timely and tornadic tome. Buy Now:The Effeminization Of The American Male
Wear this to the gym and I guarantee you’ll get some comments.

 

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Chuck Barberini Real Estate – BR Real Estate Group

I follow a blog by Doug Giles called Clash Daily it is mostly political and most of it is conservative politics.

FHA vs Conventional loans – Chuck Barberini Real Estate

Chuck Barberini Real Estate – BR Real Estate Group

FHA vs Conventional loans – Thursday November 9th

I get asked this question a lot and for the most part I either defer to the lend or say that FHA offers 96.5% loan. There are different qualifications for the property in FHA appraisals that are much stricter. The subject property is not only appraised for value, it is also inspected for safety, soundness of construction and adherence to local code restrictions. I came across this article yesterday written by Hal Bundrick a staff writer at NerdWallet, it does a great job of explaining the benefits and disadvantages of FHA loans. Take a moment and read this article and share with anyone that is considering purchasing a home in the near future. If you have any questions, I work with quality lenders that can further explain what loan better fits your situation.

Tech Sec

I saw this article On Linkedin this morning, a couple of big names teaming up:

New Salesforce and Google Partnership Shakes Up the Cloud Race

FHA loan vs. conventional mortgage: Which is right for you?

Nerd Wallet

11:59 PM, Nov 7, 2017

When exploring mortgage options, it’s likely you’ll hear about Federal Housing Administration and conventional loans. Let’s see, FHA loans are for first-time home buyers and conventional mortgages are for more established buyers — is that it?

Not necessarily.

Actually, the differences between FHA loans and conventional mortgages have narrowed in the past few years. Since 1934, loans guaranteed by the FHA have been a go-to option for first-time home buyers because they feature low down payments and relaxed credit requirements.

But conventional loans — which are not insured by a government agency like the FHA, the Department of Veterans Affairs or the U.S. Department of Agriculture — have gotten more competitive lately.

Both types of loans have their advantages. Here are the factors to consider when deciding between an FHA and a conventional mortgage.

Property standards

What kind of property are you buying? You can use a conventional loan to buy a vacation home or an investment property, as well as a primary residence.

The same can’t be said about FHA loans.

An FHA loan must be for a property that is occupied by at least one owner, as a primary residence, within 60 days of closing. Investment properties and homes that are being flipped (sold within 90 days of a prior sale) aren’t eligible for FHA loans.

FHA appraisals are more stringent, as well. Not only is the property assessed for value, it is thoroughly vetted for safety, soundness of construction and adherence to local code restrictions.

Loan limits

Where you’re planning to buy your home can play a role in what kind of loan is best for you. FHA and conventional loan guidelines allow wide latitude for borrowers in expensive areas, but in some cases you may end up needing a jumbo loan, which is bigger than FHA or conventional limits.

FHA loans are subject to county-level limits based on a percentage of a county’s median home price. In certain high-cost areas, the limit in 2017 can be as high as $636,150 — and in Alaska, Guam, Hawaii and the Virgin Islands, limits can be much higher than that.

For loans guaranteed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the government-sponsored companies that help fund the conventional mortgage industry, single-family home loan limits are $424,100 in most of the country. Again, higher loan ceilings are available in pricier counties.

You can find your county’s loan limits for FHA (shown at the link as “FHA forward”) and conventional mortgages (“Fannie/Freddie”) on the Department of Housing and Urban Development website.

Down payment

This is where conventional loans have really improved. FHA loans used to be the low-down-payment leader, requiring just 3.5% down. But now, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac both offer 97% loan-to-value products; that means a 3% down payment option — even lower than FHA — for qualified buyers.

From time to time, you can find lenders offering down payment options that are even lower on conventional loans. Quicken Loans, for instance, has offered a 1% down loan.

Foreclosures

Another instance where FHA and conventional standards have converged: how bad credit is accounted for. Over the past few years there have been numerous changes to the policies regarding bad-credit issues and how they are treated for FHA and conventional loans, with new standards implemented — and then expiring.

However, as it stands now, for a buyer to qualify for either an FHA or conventional loan, it typically must be two years since a bankruptcy was discharged and three years since a foreclosure or short sale.

There will definitely be hurdles to clear to prove to a lender that you have re-established your creditworthiness:

  • You’ll have to document that circumstances leading to the financial setback were beyond your control
  • You may have to attend a credit education course
  • Your loan will likely have to go through a manual loan approval process, which means approval and closing will likely take longer.

Mortgage insurance

With a down payment of less than 20%, both FHA and conventional loans require borrowers to pay mortgage insurance premiums. This insurance helps defray the lender’s costs if a loan defaults.

There are some differences between the two insurance programs.

With an FHA loan, if you put less than 10% down, you’ll pay 1.75% of the loan amount upfront and make monthly mortgage insurance payments for the life of the loan. With a down payment of 10% or more (that is, a loan-to-value of 90% or better), the premiums will end after 11 years.

Conventional loans with less than 20% down charge private mortgage insurance. It can be charged as an upfront expense payable at closing, or built into your monthly payment — or both. It all depends on the insurer the lender uses.

“The rates for PMI vary according to two factors: credit score and loan-to-value ratio,” Joe Parsons, a senior loan officer with PFS Funding in Dublin, California, says. He provides the following examples:

  • A borrower with a 620 score with a 97% loan-to-value will pay 2.37%
  • The same loan for a borrower with a 760 score will cost 0.69%
  • A borrower with a 620 score and a 90% loan-to-value will pay 1.10%
  • The same loan for a borrower with a 760 score will cost 0.31%

PMI generally can be canceled once your loan is paid down (and/or your property’s value appreciates) to 78% of your home’s value.

Mortgage insurance

FHA Conventional
Upfront premium cost 1.75% Depending on the insurer, there may or may not be an upfront premium. You can also opt to make a single-premium payment instead of monthly payments.
Monthly premium cost Cost varies. Based on loan term, amount and down payment. For purchase loans, the premium ranges from 0.45% to 1.05%, according to the FHA. Cost varies. Based on credit score and loan-to-value. For purchase loans, fees can range from 0.55% to 2.25%, according to Genworth and the Urban Institute.
Duration With down payments less than 10%, you’ll pay mortgage insurance for the life of the loan. With a loan-to-value equal to or greater than 90%, you’ll pay the premiums for 11 years. Usually can be canceled once your loan balance reaches 78% of your home’s value.

 

Credit score standards

Here is the primary distinction between the two types of loans: FHA loans are easier to qualify for. As far as a credit score, FHA sets a low bar: a FICO of 500 or above. Lenders can set “overlays” on top of that credit score requirement, hiking the minimum much higher.

But to qualify for the lowest FHA down payment of 3.5%, you’ll need a credit score of 580 or more, says Brian Sullivan, HUD public affairs specialist. With a credit score between 500 and 579, you’ll need to put down 10% on an FHA loan, he adds.

The average FICO score for FHA purchase loans closed in 2016 was 686, according to mortgage industry software provider Ellie Mae.

Conventional loans typically require a FICO credit score of 620 or better, Parsons says.

“A borrower with that score who can document income and assets will, in all likelihood, receive a loan approval,” he says. “They will pay a higher price for that loan because of ‘risk-based pricing’ from Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, but it is unlikely that they will be declined because of their credit score.”

Risk-based pricing means compensating the lender for taking the additional risk on a borrower with a lower credit score (the average FICO score for a conventional loan was 753 in 2016, according to Ellie Mae). In other words, the lower your credit score, the higher your mortgage interest rate.

Debt-to-income ratios

HUD’s Sullivan says your debt-to-income ratio — including the new mortgage, credit cards, student loans or any other monthly obligations — must be 50% or less for an FHA loan. Ellie Mae reports the average debt ratio for borrowers closing FHA purchase loans in 2016 was 42%.

Conventional loans usually require a debt-to-income ratio no higher than 45%, Parsons says. In 2016, borrowers with conventional purchase loans averaged a 34% debt ratio, according to Ellie Mae.

Mortgage rates

Another distinction for FHA loans: generally lower mortgage interest rates. However, the difference between the two was incremental last year. The 30-year fixed rate for FHA purchase loans closed in 2016 averaged 3.95%, compared with a conventional mortgage rate on the same term of 4.06%, according to Ellie Mae.

Refinancing

As far as mortgage refinancing goes, the edge goes to FHA “streamline” refinancing. With no credit check, no income verification and likely no home appraisal, it’s about as easy a refi as you can get. But there are five requirements for an FHA streamline refinance.

So, which mortgage to choose?

Your decision may initially be based on your credit score. If it’s well below 620, an FHA loan may be your only choice. Above 620 and you’ll want to run the numbers on both to see what works best for you.

However, if you are serving in the military or are a veteran, a loan backed by the VA may be the way to go. VA loans usually require no down payment. And if you live in a suburban or rural area, a USDA loan could be a smart option, too.

FHA Loans vs. Conventional Loans

  FHA Conventional
Property type Financing for a primary residence only Financing for a primary residence, second home or investment property
Down payment  Down payments as low as 3.5% Some programs offer down payments as low as 3% or even lower
Mortgage insurance Mortgage insurance premiums required: 1.75% upfront and monthly premiums that vary with your loan term, loan amount and down payment, from 0.45% to 1.05% With a down payment lower than 20%, private mortgage insurance is usually required. Monthly fees vary according to credit score, loan-to-value and insurer, and range from 0.55% to 2.25%.
Credit score Credit score of 500 or better is usually required, though this depends on the lender. Average FICO score in 2016: 686. Credit score of 620 or higher is usually required, though this depends on the lender. Average FICO score in 2016: 753, according to Ellie Mae.
Debt ratio Average 2016 debt ratio: 42% Average 2016 debt ratio: 34%
Interest rates Interest rates for FHA loans tend to be slightly lower than for conventional loans Interest rates for conventional loans tend to be slightly higher than for FHA loans

Hal Bundrick is a staff writer at NerdWallet, a personal finance website. Email: hal@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @halmbundrick.

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FHA loan vs. conventional mortgage: Which is right for you?

 FHA vs Conventional loans

Chuck Barberini Real Estate – BR Real Estate Group

 

Are Homes More Affordable – Chuck Barberini Real Estate

Chuck Barberini Real Estate – BR Real Estate Group

Check out this article from Realtor Magazine Online. It is a real unique look at the housing market and offers a very original point of view. It gives us some good insight into the rapid rise of house prices and how they compare to the prices prior to the pre-crash prices.

Homes Are More Affordable Than 20 Years Ago

DAILY REAL ESTATE NEWS | WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 08, 2017

Homes are actually more affordable now than they were in the late 1990s, according to the latest Mortgage Monitor Report by Black Knight Inc., a mortgage data and performance information provider.

A Closer Look: NAR’s Housing Affordability Index

Interest rates have plunged by 40 basis points over the past six months. However, the bulk of the potential savings is offset by the accelerating rate of home price appreciation across the country.

“Rising home prices continue to offset the majority of would-be savings from recent interest rate declines, which has kept affordability near a post recession low,” says Ben Graboske, executive vice president of data & analytics for Black Knight. “That being said, when viewing the market through a longer-term lens, affordability across most of the country still remains favorable to long-term benchmarks.”

As of September, 21.4 percent of the median income nationwide was required to purchase a median-priced home. From 1995 to 1999, that percentage was 24.2 percent, and from 2000 to 2003 it was 26.2 percent, according to Black Knight’s report.

While the monthly payment needed for a median-priced home is up $100 from a year ago, the national “payment-to-income” ratio remains 2.8 percent below averages from the late 1990s, according to the report.

“In looking at the affordability landscape across the country, we certainly see varying levels of affordability in each market compared to their own long-term benchmarks,” Graboske says. “But, by and large, the overall theme is that affordability in most areas, while tightening, remains favorable to long-term norms.”

Black Knight researchers note that 47 of 50 states’ payment-to-income ratios remain below their 1995–2003 averages. Hawaii, California, Oregon, and Washington, D.C., are the lone exceptions, where payment-to-income ratios are higher today than their long-term benchmarks.

Source: Black Knight Inc.

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 Chuck Barberini Real Estate – BR Real Estate Group

It’s Christmas – A Different Kind of Poem – Chuck Barberini

It’s Christmas – My boy Christopher is home for a couple of weeks and I saw this last night and it really hit me… It touched me and made me sad, it made me happy and proud, it made me think about the sacrifices of so many and how blessed we are to be American… Thank you to those in service all over the world, away from home… Merry Christmas.

Take a minute to read this poem and let me know what you think.

Different Christmas Poem

 

 

 

 

The embers glowed softly, and in their dim light,
I gazed round the room and I cherished the sight.
My wife was asleep, her head on my chest,
My daughter beside me, angelic in rest.


Outside the snow fell, a blanket of white,
Transforming the yard to a winter delight.
The sparkling lights in the tree I believe,
Completed the magic that was Christmas Eve.


My eyelids were heavy, my breathing was deep,
Secure and surrounded by love I would sleep.
In perfect contentment, or so it would seem,
So I slumbered, perhaps I started to dream.


The sound wasn’t loud, and it wasn’t too near,
But I opened my eyes when it tickled my ear.

Perhaps just a cough, I didn’t quite know,
Then the sure sound of footsteps outside in the snow.


My soul gave a tremble, I struggled to hear,
And I crept to the door just to see who was near.

Standing out in the cold and the dark of the night,
A lone figure stood, his face weary and tight.


A soldier, I puzzled, some twenty years old,
Perhaps a Marine, huddled here in the cold.
Alone in the dark, he looked up and smiled,
Standing watch over me, and my wife and my child.


“What are you doing?” I asked without fear,
“Come in this moment, it’s freezing out here!
Put down your pack, brush the snow from your sleeve,
You should be at home on a cold Christmas Eve!”


For barely a moment I saw his eyes shift,
Away from the cold and the snow blown in drifts…
To the window that danced with a warm fire’s light
Then he sighed and he said “It’s really all right.


I’m out here by choice. I’m here every night. ”
“It’s my duty to stand at the front of the line,
That separates you from the darkest of times.
No one had to ask or beg or implore me,

I’m proud to stand here like my fathers before me.


My Gramps died at ‘ Pearl on a day in December,”
Then he sighed, “That’s a Christmas ‘Gram always remembers. ”
My dad stood his watch in the jungles of ‘ Nam ‘,
And now it is my turn and so, here I am.


I’ve not seen my own son in more than a while,
But my wife sends me pictures, he’s sure got her smile.
Then he bent and he carefully pulled from his bag,
The red, white, and blue… an American flag.


I can live through the cold and the being alone,
Away from my family, my house and my home.
I can stand at my post through the rain and the sleet,
I can sleep in a foxhole with little to eat.


I can carry the weight of killing another,
Or lay down my life with my sister and brother.
Who stand at the front against any and all,
To ensure for all time that this flag will not fall.”


”  So go back inside,” he said, “harbor no fright,
Your family is waiting and I’ll be all right. ”
“But isn’t there something I can do, at the least,
“Give you money,” I asked, “or prepare you a feast?

It seems all too little for all that you’ve done,
For being away from your wife and your son. “


Then his eye welled a tear that held no regret,
“Just tell us you love us, and never forget.
To fight for our rights back at home while we’re gone,
To stand your own watch, no matter how long.


For when we come home, either standing or dead,
To know you remember we fought and we bled.
Is payment enough, and with that we will trust,
That we mattered to you as you mattered to us. “

 


PLEASE, would you do me the kind favor of sending this to as many
people as you can? Christmas will be coming soon and some credit is due to our
U. S. service men and women for our being able to celebrate these
festivities. Let’s try in this small way to pay a tiny bit of what we owe. Make people stop and think of our heroes, living and dead, who sacrificed themselves for us.

LCDR Jeff Giles, SC, USN
30th Naval Construction Regiment
OIC, Logistics Cell One
Al Taqqadum, Iraq

“Real Integrity is doing the right thing, knowing that no body’s going to know whether you did it or not. “

PFC Christopher Barberini

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SF Bay Agents

B|R Real Estate Group

Phoenix Property Management

 

 

Friday The 14th of October… Chuck Barberini Real Estate

Friday The 14th of October… Chuck Barberini Real Estate
Chuck Barberini Real Estate – BR Real Estate Group
For today, I’m just throwing some random stuff together and we’ll see where it goes.
The Giants – Even year and I’m up – I’m Down – I’m up then I’m down again

First of all, I’m still pissed that the Giants lost game 4 at home. I must admit that I was not overly optimistic that they were going anywhere this year. Every time that I counted them out they would prove me wrong. The season started and I was not excited, I didn’t think that they had done enough in the off season. Dennard Span, Jeff Samardzija and Johnny Cueto were good additions, but we missed out on Zack Greinke. We still had Posey, Pence, Belt, Pagan, Crawford, Duffy and Panik and of course Madison Bumgarner, so we should be competitive.

They come out

of the gates, so-so, win some and lose some, then they catch fire… May, June and up until the All-star break they are winning. They are getting through injuries and nobody is on fire, but they keep winning. So, now I’m getting excited 57-33 and a 7 game lead, the best record in baseball. Then they came back from the break and lost and lost in every way possible. The Padres owned them, Santiago Casillas lost his confidence and in spite of 31 saves could close out a game. The Dodgers caught and passed them and they were leaking some serious oil and limping to the finish line. Just to make the playoffs, they had to sweep the Dodgers in the last series of the season.san-francisco-giants

Off to New York

for a one game playoff with the Mets, an awesome pitcher’s duel with Mad Bum tossing a complete game shutout and some late game heroics from Conor Gillespie and they were off to Chicago, to play the Cubs, the hottest team in baseball for a best of 5 series. I’m excited again… Game one, Cueto is pitching a gem, but throws one bad pitch and gives up a homer in the 8th and down go the Giants. Game 2 Samardzija pitching again in Chicago and gets roughed up early and its back to SF down 2 games and playing a sudden death at home. Game 3, the Giants have their Mr. October, Mad Bumm going, I’m cautiously optimistic, but it starts bad, an early homer to the Cubs pitcher and we are down 3 nothing, oh well it was a good run… but they come back and are up 5-3 in the 9th, here comes the bullpen and there goes the lead.

I’m bummed

but it’s October, it’s an even year and it’s the Giants… Crawford and Panik combined for a dramatic walk off win in the 13th, I’m stoked. Matt Moore was dealing in game 4 and the Giants take a 5-2 lead into the ninth… Here we come Chicago, game 5 and Johnny Cueto is set to go, but here comes the bull pen and there goes the game and game 5 and the season…. Un-freaking believable and, oh yea, I’m bummed…

October 14th 1947 Air Force test pilot Chuck Yeager broke the sound barrier piloting the experimental Bell X-1. x1

I read his book years ago and there was also a large section on him in “The Right Stuff” I have admired him for years and was surprised to see that he is alive and well, 93 years young and is quiet an accomplished Tweeter… Check out some of these classics. Chuck Yeager Twitter

 

“The Reaper”

I saw this article today, linked on my Task & Purpose email… I’m looking forward to seeing this production, but a couple of things jumped out at me from the article. Nicholas Irving aka the Reaper is the son of military veterans and is the first African American Sniper in the 3rd Ranger Battalion. What was really interesting is that the production is based on a self-published book that Irving wrote during a four-day alcohol binge. CB

Jay Z Is Producing A TV Show About Legendary Sniper Nicholas Irving

By ADAM LINEHAN on October 12, 2016

Irving earned the nickname “the Reaper” for purportedly killing 33 insurgents during a deployment to Afghanistan in 2009.

Rapper Jay Z is producing a six-part miniseries about Nicholas Irving, who earned the nickname “the Reaper” while serving with the U.S. Army’s 3rd Ranger Battalion from 2004 to 2010.

According to Page Six, the show is being produced for NBC.

Irving, who grew up in Maryland, deployed multiple times to Iraq and Afghanistan and saw heavy combat throughout his career. During a four-month deployment to Afghanistan as a direct-action sniper in 2009, he purportedly killed 33 enemy combatants.

In addition to

being one of the deadliest snipers in American history, Irving, the son of two Cold War military veterans, holds the distinction of being the first African-American sniper to serve with 3rd Ranger Battalion.the-reaper

The six-part miniseries will be based on Irving’s 2015 memoir, “The Reaper: Autobiography of One of the Deadliest Special Ops Snipers,” which primarily focuses on Irving’s legendary 2009 Afghan deployment. A source told Page Six filming will begin early next year.

In a recent interview with Task & Purpose, Irving explained that he had written “The Reaper” during a four-day alcohol binge after leaving the Army. The memoir was initially self-published on CreateSpace.com and then picked up by St. Martin’s Press. Irving’s second book, “Way of the Reaper: My Greatest Untold Missions and the Art of Being a Sniper,” was published in August of this year.

Irving is also

a co-host of Fox’s “American Grit,” a reality series that premiered in April and was recently renewed for a second season.

Actor Sterling K. Brown, who won an Emmy for his portrayal of Christopher Darden in FX’s critically acclaimed 2016 series “The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story,” will star as Irving, Page Six reports.

On Oct. 10, Irving confirmed the news on Instagram.

And another thing…

7Colin Kaepernick is starting for the 49ers this weekend. He is an embarrassment, his national anthem protest is disgusting and the 49ers are un-watchable. 3 years removed from the Super Bowl. Alex Smith has had a nice career since he lost his job and team to an injury…

 

Go Warriors
Friday The 14th of October…
Chuck Barberini
Chuck Barberini

 

Friday The 14th of October… Chuck Barberini Real Estate
Chuck Barberini Real Estate – BR Real Estate Group

Being Lazy Can Equal Great Success – Chuck Barberini Real Estate

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Being Lazy Can Equal Great Success

Barberini Robinson Real Estate Group

This is a fun article that I came across today @lifehack.org today. Michael Daws puts an interesting twist on productivity. He shows how being lazy can help you be more successful, but what he is really showing is how to prioritize. Focus on what’s important now, delegate, focus, look for a better way to complete your task. Check out this article and let me know what you think. Click on the link below to see the current interest rates.

Good Luck, Chuck

8 Reasons Why Being Lazy Will Lead You to Great Success

PRODUCTIVITYBY MICHAEL DAWS

Your whole life you’ve been told things like “hard work is the only key to success,” or maybe even “you will never amount to anything if you don’t work hard for it.” While these statements are somewhat true, what if I told you that you could be very successful and still be lazy at the same time?

Being lazy doesn’t necessarily mean not having to do anything, it just means you find an easier way to do it so you don’t have to work as hard. Here are some of the ways that being a lazy person can help you to find great success.

 

  1. You avoid busy work

There is nothing that I absolutely hate more in the workplace than busywork. Unimportant meetings that have no effect on your particular department, or meetings that achieve nothing aside from taking up your time. This is time that could be spent actually getting the job done so you can get the heck out of there.

Lazy people would rather take the task they are assigned and get it done, get it done quickly, and get it done right, so they don’t have to spend any more time on it than absolutely necessary.

  1. You know how to delegate to cover more ground

Lazy people make really good leaders, and this point proves it. You put a lazy person in charge of a group of people for a project, they know how to delegate people to certain tasks based on their skills so the job can be done quickly and efficiently. It doesn’t make sense to have one person do everything or have everybody focus on one thing at a time — lazy people usually have a knack for making sure this does not happen.

  1. You are clever, so you can be lazy

If you are lazy, you must be clever in order to be efficient. In the workplace, you can be two of four things: lazy or diligent, clever or stupid. If you are clever and lazy, you have a tendency to be the most efficient. This just means you can get more done while doing less work.

  1. You always look for a quicker, more effective way of doing things

Bill Gates said that he would always hire a lazy person to do a difficult job at Microsoft, because they would always find an easier way to do it. Just because you are diligent and clever, doesn’t mean you are going to be more efficient. This just means you will get the job done — but you are probably going to do it without finding a better way, and you are going to take a lot of unnecessary steps to get it done.

  1. You focus on only the bare necessities

When given a task to do, lazy people tend to only focus on what is needed, rather than all of the extra details to get the job done. I’m not saying that there is anything wrong with going the extra mile every once in a while, but sometimes it can be too much and it’s just a wasted effort. Lazy people have an ability to figure out when is a good time and when it is unnecessary to do a little extra.

  1. You know how to procrastinate

Procrastination has always been seen as a bad thing, but if you are lazy and clever you know how to use procrastination to your advantage. Lazy people who procrastinate and wait until the last minute have no choice but to focus on the job and get it done in time. They know that there is no room for error or extras, so they get the job done quickly and done well in less time than a diligent worker.

  1. You are lazy because you are efficient

Sometimes it may seem that people are just plain being lazy, constantly scrolling their Twitter feeds and reloading Facebook, while you are busy busting your butt. The reality of it is that they knew how to get their job done faster and easier and simply just have the time to sit around.

  1. You know how to make money when they are sleeping

That is the ultimate dream, right?  Wake up and look at your bank account and have more money in it than you did when you fell asleep. Lazy people know how to utilize online tools and services that allow them to make money without having to work a lot. It will take some work to develop things that will sell, but then you can sit around and make money afterwards without having to sweat.

Its all about how you look at things. You don’t have to work your fingers to the bone day in and day out to be successful. It’s all about how you can get more done in less time and produce bigger results than before.

Chuck Just Chillin'
Chuck Just Chillin’

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Griffey Jr. & Piazza Hall of Fame – Chuck Barberini

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Griffey Jr. & Piazza Hall of Fame – Chuck Barberini

As a long time baseball fan, I am very pleased with this year’s inductees. Ken Griffey Jr. and Mike Piazza. Two great players that could have not been more different, not only in their careers, but also in the roads that lead them to the Hall of Fame.

When you consider the thinning out process on the path to the major leagues, it really is remarkable. Every city has a little league program and there are many teams for the 6-7 & 8-year-old kids, along the way many of those kids get bored and stop playing and by the time young boys are eighth graders there are only a hand full of teams because so many have dropped out, or in this day and age, moved on to lacrosse. The survivors then move on to high school where the cream starts to rise to the top, of all of the little leaguers that enter the 9th grade only 15-20 players make the freshman team.

By the time a player becomes a senior, there is probably only 8-10 players left playing. This is every high school in every town in the country. The survivors then move on to college where the thinning continues, unless you are one of the very elite players and sign a professional contract right out of High School.

If you are fortunate enough to get signed by one of the 32 professional organizations, you start playing for one of the team’s 6 – 8 minor league affiliates with other survivors, only this time you are with survivors from all over the world. The best move up, surviving the thinning out, surviving injuries, and travel and being away from home and coaches that you don’t get along with and if you survive all of that, you make one of the 32 teams.

You have been the best of the best in little league and high school and college and through the minor leagues and you finally arrive, you make the show, you’ve got it made, or do you? No, now you have to become a regular and earn a position and keep that position year after year while other survivors try to take it away from you. If can do that and do it well and do it long enough, then maybe, you will survive once more and become a member of the Hall of Fame.

Ken Griffey Jr. is a baseball legacy, his dad a professional player and he grew up in and around professional baseball, he was a number one draft choice and starter for the Mariners while still a teenager. He was smoother and graceful, he hit with power and made unbelievable plays in the outfield.
img0000227AA.JPG

Piazza-MetsMike Piazza had a dream and worked, he hit every day as a youth in a back yard batting cage, when it snowed, he wrapped his bat in pipe insulation. He was picked in the 62nd round of the draft and didn’t start playing catcher until he was a professional.

Despite the different routes to Cooperstown and the Baseball Hall of Fame, these two survivors shared the stage yesterday and achieved what so few do. They will always be remembered along with the legends of the game.

Check out a couple of the links the I have attached on these two Hall of Famers. I really like the two by Grant Brisbee  @mccoveychron …

Let me know what you think, Chuck

Mike Piazza was terrifying and the Dodgers should have kept him
Ken Griffey Jr. was a transcendent motherf**ker
Mike Piazza and Ken Griffey Jr. inducted into Baseball Hall of Fame

Tribune news services

Contact Reporter

Staring out at their families and tens of thousands of fans who hung on every word, Ken

Griffey Jr. and Mike Piazza were inducted Sunday into the Baseball Hall of Fame in a ceremony tinged with tears all around.

“I stand up here humbled and overwhelmed,” Griffey said. “I can’t describe how it feels.”

The two became a piece of history on their special day. Griffey, the first pick of the 1987 amateur draft, became the highest pick ever inducted. Piazza, a 62nd-round pick the next year —No. 1,390 — is the lowest pick to enter the Hall of Fame.

Griffey played 22 big-league seasons with the Mariners, Reds and White Sox and was selected on a record 99.32 percent of ballots cast, an affirmation of sorts for his clean performance during baseball’s so-called Steroids Era.

A 13-time All-Star and 10-time Gold Glove Award winner in center field, Griffey hit 630 home runs, sixth all-time, and drove in 1,836 runs. He also was the American League MVP in 1997, drove in at least 100 runs in eight seasons, and won seven Silver Slugger Awards.

Griffey, who fell just three votes shy of being the first unanimous selection, hit 417 of his 630 homers and won all 10 of his Gold Gloves with the Seattle Mariners. He played the first 11 seasons of his career with the Mariners and led them to the playoffs for the first two times in franchise history.

“Thirteen years with the Seattle Mariners, from the day I got drafted, Seattle, Washington, has been a big part of my life,” Griffey said, punctuating the end of his speech by putting a baseball cap on backward as he did throughout his career.

“I’m going to leave you with one thing. In 22 years I learned that one team will treat you the best, and that’s your first team. I’m damn proud to be a Seattle Mariner.”

Dubbed “The Natural” for his effortless excellence at the plate and in center field, Griffey avoided the Hall of Fame until his special weekend because he wanted his first walk through the front doors of the stately building on Main Street to be with his kids, whom he singled out one by one in his 20-minute speech.

“There are two misconceptions about me — I didn’t work hard and everything I did I made look easy,” Griffey said. “Just because I made it look easy doesn’t mean that it was. You don’t become a Hall of Famer by not working, but working day in and day out.”

Griffey’s mom, Birdie, and his father, former Cincinnati Reds star Ken Sr., both cancer survivors and integral to his rise to stardom, were front and center in the first row.

“To my dad, who taught me how to play this game and to my mom, the strongest woman I know,” Junior said. “To have to be mom and dad, she was our biggest fan and our biggest critic. She’s the only woman I know that lives in one house and runs five others.”

Selected in the draft by the Dodgers after Hall of Fame manager Tommy Lasorda, a close friend of Piazza’s father, Vince, put in a good word, Piazza struggled. He briefly quit the game while in the minor leagues, returned and persevered despite a heavy workload as he switched from first base to catcher and teammates criticized his erratic play.

Mom and dad were foremost on his mind, too.

“Dad always dreamed of playing in the major leagues,” said Piazza, just the second Hall of Famer depicted on his plaque wearing a Mets cap, after Tom Seaver in 1992.

“He could not follow that dream because of the realities of life. My father’s faith in me, often greater than my own, is the single most important factor of me being inducted into this Hall of Fame. Thank you dad. We made it, dad. The race is over. Now it’s time to smell the roses.”

Piazza played 16 years with the Dodgers, Marlins, Mets, Padres and Athletics and hit 427 home runs, including a major league record 396 as a catcher. A 12-time All-Star, Piazza won 10 Silver Slugger Awards and finished in the top five of his league’s MVP voting four times.

Perhaps even more impressive, Piazza, a .308 career hitter, posted six seasons with at least 30 home runs, 100 RBIs and a .300 batting average (all other catchers in baseball history combined have posted nine such seasons).

Though the Dodgers gave him his start, Piazza found a home in New York when he was traded to the Mets in May 1998.

Three years later, Piazza became a hero to the hometown fans with perhaps the most notable home run of his career. His two-run shot in the eighth inning at Shea Stadium lifted the Mets to a 3-2 victory over the Atlanta Braves in the first sporting event played in New York after the 9/11 terror attacks.

Piazza paid tribute to that moment.

“To witness the darkest evil of the human heart … will be forever burned in my soul,” Piazza said. “But from tragedy and sorrow came bravery, love, compassion, character and eventual healing.

“Many of you give me praise for the two-run home run in the first game back on Sept. 21st, but the true praise belongs to police, firefighters, first responders that knew that they were going to die, but went forward anyway.”

Attendance was estimated at around 50,000 by the Hall of Fame, tying 1999 for second-most all time.

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Why Inflation Fears Are Growing – Chuck Barberini

Why Inflation Fears Are Growing

National Association of Realtors

Chuck Barberini Real Estate – Barberini Robinson Real Estate Group

This is an interesting article, from the National Association of Realtors, that talks about the potential rise in inflation 2017. It states that inflation has started to rise and should continue through the first quarter of 2017. It also refers to the fact that rents are on the rise and rental properties are harder to come by. Interest rates remain low, but inventory remains tight with housing prices up and should maintain the higher prices based on the scarcity of available houses. The media will continue to be the voice of doom and gloom because negative press sells. It is good to be aware of what is going on in the market, but the fact remains that there are still opportunities in the housing market. Check out this article, be sure to click on the link regarding the housing for the rest of 2016. There is also a link at the bottom of the page that you can click to see the current market data and interest rates. If you like this article, let me know. Follow my blog at blog.chuckbarberini.com. Thanks for reading, Chuck

Why Inflation Fears Are GrowingiStock_000010774987XSmall

National Association of Realtors

Inflation is up by 1.1 percent through the first half of the year, and economists anticipate it will to continue to rise well into 2017. Rising inflation is expected to have a widespread impact for the economy, particularly the housing market. Lawrence Yun, chief economist of the National Association of REALTORS®, writes in his monthly Forbes.com column.

Read more4 Housing Predictions for the Rest of 2016

“One consistent area of inflationary concern is arising out of housing,” Yun writes. “Rents increased by 3.8 percent in June, the strongest pace since January of 2008.”

Apartment vacancy rates continue to be very tight, which means renters likely won’t see a decrease in rental costs anytime soon.

For those looking to buy, they’ll face plenty of challenges too. Home values are climbing quickly. Home prices nationwide have increased around 5 percent to 6 percent this year – on top of the 20 percent increase that occurred in the three years prior, Yun notes. Given limited inventories of homes for sale, home prices aren’t likely to drop anytime soon either, Yun adds.

“Going forward, a major driver of inflation will be related to housing,” Yun notes. “With inadequate new housing construction, both rents and home prices will easily outpace the general inflation. … Housing costs, moreover, weigh a hefty 33 percent on the overall consumer price index, compared to 14 percent weight for food, 7 percent for energy, and 6 percent for transportation.”Screen-Shot-2015-01-27-at-11.18.59-AM

Source: “Inflation: Slowly Warming,” Forbes.com (July 15, 2016)

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Why Inflation Fears Are Growing

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